He had worked hard and had been richly rewarded. The crops had been particularly successful. Harvest season had arrived, and he was getting ready to store the grain for the winter season. But he realized that he had surplus grain, more than his barns could store. So he decided to build bigger barns.  

“Then he said, ‘This is what I’ll do. I will tear down my barns and build bigger ones, and there I will store my surplus grain. (Luke 12:18)

This seems to be the direction so much of the world is heading. Where it seems that many who live in prosperity and abundance are becoming increasingly unwilling to share their surplus. So much so, that they are seeking to build walls or implement laws that will keep out the hungry, the needy, the refugee, the persecuted. And protect what they see as their rights, property, jobs, and lifestyle.

Essentially building bigger barns to hoard their grain, rather than open the barn doors and share the harvest.

And yet, Scripture repeatedly calls anyone who has been blessed with abundance, to share with those who are less fortunate and may not have had the benefit of such advantages or privileges or opportunities.

Isaiah writes,” Is it not to share your food with the hungry and to provide the poor wanderer with shelter— when you see the naked, to clothe them, and not to turn away from your own flesh and blood?” (Isaiah 58:7)

John encourages that, “Anyone who has two shirts should share with the one who has none, and anyone who has food should do the same. (Luke 3:11)

And Paul repeats the  challenge for us to  “Share with the Lord’s people who are in need. Practice hospitality.”(Romans 12:13)

We see this call echoing throughout the pages of Scripture.

So instead of building bigger barns, we are called to invite in the hungry and provide the wanderer with shelter.

Being willing to share what we have. Open our homes. And share the harvest.

 

 

This is Day 18 of my Write 31 Days series for 2017:  @fiveminutefriday daily prompt:  SHARE

For an index of all my posts in the series, please click here.

Photo credits: Michael Kubicek and Joshua Newton, from Unsplash 

 

 

 

 

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